EVERY TUESDAY!

RECIPES: September 13

For the final week of the 2016 market season, a fitting recipe collection might come from “How to Cook Everything – Fast” by Mark Bittman.  Bittman’s Facebook page showcases his cookbook, a new app, and recipes for things like spaghetti squash and many other basics and not-basics.

As with many recipe sites, the comments from cooks are a great resource. Here’s a comment/instructions on cooking spaghetti squash (a squash I saw at Ali Family Garden’s booth last week).

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Turn the oven to 450 — leave the spaghetti squash WHOLE. Prick the spaghetti squash several times with the tines of a fork. Place in oven and cook — turning once — until the squash feels soft. You can also cook it this way in the microwave. When soft, remove from oven. Cut the squash in HALF down the middle — NOT LENGTH WISE. Remove the seeds and orange fibers. Use a fork to separate the strands from the sides of the squash. NOTE: If you cut the squash in half, the strands will remain nice and long like spaghetti noodles. Doing it this way is easier, and safer because cutting the squash length wise when it is raw is difficult and can be dangerous if you slip or get the knife stuck. And this way, the “noodles” steam oil free in the their own jacket. They come out cooked, but still retain their shape — the fibers grow around the squash — not lengthwise. You can top or mix the noodles with anything you like — low fat tomato sauce….If you are not watching your fat intake, a really easy recipe is to mix in fried onions, herb of choice, salt and pepper to taste and some cream cheese while the noodles are still warm. You can eat it this way immediately — or put the mixture in a casserole and bake it again until the top is browned.

Bittman also advocates that we cook for ourselves at home. One person who is doing that is Michelle Singletary, a finance writer. Read her story about changing her cooking and eating habits (she notes Bittman’s book is hefty and costly, but she says it’s worth it).

So, thanks for attending Beaverdale Farmers Market, and have fun cooking this fall and winter.

PLANT YOUR OWN SEED!